Cannabis Leaf

Cannabinoids In The Beauty Industry

Recently, we’ve seen a surge in beauty products leveraging the power of cannabinoids and their therapeutic effects. According to Zion Market research, the Cannabinoid-Based Beauty Products Market was worth $5.1 billion in 2018 and is expected to multiply to $18 billion by 2026. (1)

In this post we will break down why cannabinoids are taking the beauty market by storm. First, we will share the current market size and trends that foreshadow success for cannabinoids based beauty products. Second, we’ll share how endocannabinoids and phytocannabinoids interact with our skin health. Next, we’ll share the scientific literature detailing specific cannabinoids’ impact as a topical remedy. Finally, we’ll dive into what the future of this category might look like. 

The Current Beauty Market

The global beauty industry is currently valued at $532 billion, according to Forbes. “While projections for growth vary, most agree it will continue to advance at a 5-7% CAGR to reach or exceed $800 billion by 2025.”(2) This massive market comprises several smaller segments, including skincare, oral hygiene, body care, and cosmetics. If you walk down a drugstore aisle, you’ll see evidence of this thriving industry in countless types of shampoos, ointments, moisturizers, anti-aging treatments and so on.

Today’s consumers are looking for natural, clean, and sustainable beauty products. According to market research by Ipsos, two-thirds of consumers reported that they would be, “interested in trying new products from other brands if they are natural.” Another 59% said they would be interested in trying products that are “clean.” Finally, 55% said they would be interested in “sustainable” products.(3)

Fortunately, many cannabinoid-based beauty products fit these descriptors. Cannabinoids work naturally with the body’s endocannabinoid system to produce different results. Plus, hemp has a reputation as a “sustainable, organic and regenerative agricultural crop.(4) As for if hemp is “clean” or not, that depends on how plants are processed or formulated. But, there are plenty of ways to create clean, hemp-derived products.

Above all else, however, beauty buyers want products that actually work. Hemp-infused beauty products are purported to be better than conventional options because hemp oil is similar to natural oils that are produced by the human body. Plus, skin has natural cannabinoid receptors, which makes topical cannabinoids absorbable and effective.

There is a huge opportunity within the multi-billion dollar beauty industry for natural, clean, and sustainable products and cannabinoid-based beauty products are in a position to grab a lot of that growth. Let’s dive into the research to see why cannabinoids are so effective for many different treatments.

Cannabinoids Role In Skin Health:

In a 2019 review, scientists studied the role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in our integumentary system (skin). Previous studies had demonstrated the importance of the ECS in immune function and the nervous system, but the role of the ECS in the skin was less understood. By the time the review was finished that had all changed.

The authors concluded that the ECS was “deeply involved in the maintenance of skin homeostasis, barrier formation and regeneration, and its dysregulation was implicated to contribute to several highly prevalent diseases and disorders, e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, scleroderma, acne, hair growth and pigmentation disorders, keratin diseases, various tumors, and itch.”(5)

In short, different cannabinoids can tell cells what to do and when to do it. Normally, cannabinoids produced by the body (endocannabinoids) manage all of this on their own, and skin remains healthy. However, when your integumentary system is out of balance, you end up with acne, dry skin, or some of the other disorders listed above. If you’re interested in learning more about the process of cannabinoids, enzymes, and receptors you can read this post.

For years, we’ve been treating symptoms instead of causes. But, now that we know how the ECS can cause skin conditions, we can actually address the root of these issues. Phytocannabinoids, or cannabinoids that come from plants, can bind with endogenous cannabinoid receptor sites much like endocannabinoids do. This means phytocannabinoids can be used to stimulate underactive sites or downregulate overactive ones. 

By stimulating or inhibiting various receptor sites, cannabinoids may be able to produce targeted hair growth or loss, alleviate sunburn, darken or lighten skin pigmentation, fight tumors, alleviate dry skin, and stop acne or itches.(5) If this is all true, the cannabinoid-based beauty market may be even bigger than expected.

However, as of today, a lot of this is still theoretical. If research into the other aspects of the ECS has taught us anything, it’s that cannabinoid signalling is a delicate and complex science. Getting the right phytocannabinoids to the right receptor sites is no easy task. Questions about how cannabinoids work with the skin loom large and we will surface the most up-to-date research on how cannabinoids can influence the beauty category. 

Minor Cannabinoids’ Therapeutic Potential In Skincare:  

In a 2016 study, scientists examined how a range of minor cannabinoids influenced sebocyte function. As a refresher, sebocytes are gland cells that produce natural oils to protect skin. But, when too much of this oil is produced acne breakouts can occur. At the same time, if too little oil is manufactured, the result may be dry skin. 

Amazingly, many different cannabinoids seemed to either increase or suppress the function of these cells. In particular CBG and CBGV increased sebaceous liquid synthesis, leading researchers to conclude that they might be able to treat “dry-skin syndrome.” On the other hand, CBC, CBDV, and especially THCV, are promising anti-acne agents.(6) 

We’ll now dive deeper into the therapeutic potential of these rare cannabinoids.

Cannabigerol (CBG) Supporting Skin Health: 

Studies have found CBG offers “potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis” as an anti-inflammatory.(7)  Psoriasis causes cellular buildup on the surface of the skin, and experts surmise that inflammation is a root cause. There is also evidence CBG acts as an effective antibacterial agent, which could be useful in the treatment of acne and other bacterial skin conditions.(8)

Cannabichromene (CBC) Supporting Skin Health: 

This exciting cannabinoid has shown anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity in animal studies.(9)(10) One 2016 study noted that CBC displayed “remarkable anti-inflammatory actions” related to acne.(11) A cannabinoid that can calm inflammation while also relieving pain could have immense use since many skin problems tied to inflammation — such as dermatitis, psoriasis and eczema — cause severe discomfort. 

Cannabidivarin (CBDV) Supporting Skin Health: 

Recent studies indicate CBDV may help dry skin syndrome as well as acne.(12) Researchers also found that CBDV may reduce allergic inflammation, atopic dermatitis, acne and seborrhea (a.k.a. dandruff).(13) These properties could make CBDV ideal for incorporating into hypoallergenic products, or topicals designed for sensitive, itch-prone skin. 

Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) Supporting Skin Health: 

Unlike its non-varin counterpart, THCV is non-psychotropic, and research on animal models indicates THCV can decrease signs of inflammation and inflammatory pain, a combination that could be useful in topical analgesics.(14) THCV also has been found to suppress basal sebaceous lipid synthesis, which could help acne sufferers whose condition is triggered by excessive oil production. Experimental Dermatology noted that of all of the phytocannabinoids examined, THCV showed the most promise of becoming a “highly efficient, novel anti-acne agent.” (15)

CBD Supporting Skin Health:

CBD for Psoriasis, Acne, & Scarring: A 2019 study examined the effects of CBD ointment on psoriasis, acne, and scarring in a group of 20 patients. After three months of CBD supplementation, the patients exhibit improved skin hydration, superior skin elasticity, and general symptom reduction.(16)

While this small study is certainly just a start, it’s very exciting to see CBD delivering on some of the anti-aging, anti-scarring, and anti-acne properties that were suggested by studies on the ECS.

CBD & THC fighting melanoma: In a 2015 animal study, scientists applied a mixture of CBD and THC to cancerous melanomas on mice. The cannabinoids killed off and inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that topical creams may really work against skin cancer.(17)

CBD for topical pain management: Another study published this year found that cannabinoids could be a great addition to current offerings. Over a month-long, placebo-controlled study, a group of adults suffering from nerve pain reported that CBD oil delivered a significant reduction in intense pain, sharp pain, cold and itchy sensations without reporting any adverse effects.(18) CBD might not replace Icy Hot or Aleve tomorrow, but these strong results show it could be a valuable addition to the pain management market.

Cannabinoids may be the future of toothpaste: The toothpaste aisle is full of tons of different options, many of which have the same cleansing chemicals. However, this might change soon. Earlier this year, a preliminary study revealed that many cannabinoids are better at killing the bacteria that cause dental plaque than commercially available toothpaste.(19)

In particular, dental plaque samples treated with CBGA, CBN, CBG, CBD, and CBC all yielded fewer bacteria counts than those treated with Oral-B or Colgate toothpaste. However, it is worth noting that the study only had 60 participants. We’ll likely need to see a few larger studies replicate these results before 9 out 10 dentists start recommending cannabinoid-based toothpaste.

Cannabinoids could make great itch cream: In 2006, German scientists reported that the cannabimimetic N-palmitoyl ethanolamine (PEA) reduced levels of itchiness by 86.4%. Given the recent breakthroughs in cannabinoid cultivation, it’s only a matter of time before someone replaces PEA with a more natural, accessible cannabinoid. (20) CBD looks like a good option as both PEA and CBD are known to enhance anandamide signalling. 

 

The therapeutic range displayed in this research explains why the beauty industry is so excited about cannabinoids. While there is plenty more to learn, these early signals show us how important it is for additional research to be conducted on cannabinoid-based beauty and topical products. 

 

The Future of Cannabinoid-Based Beauty

As always, it’s worth noting that cannabinoid supplements are only as good as their sourcing and formulating. Cannabinoids have a number of benefits, but these can easily be outweighed by harsh chemicals or unwanted additives. 

We anticipate seeing cannabinoids become additives to almost every product in the beauty category and we know that consumers in the beauty industry have voiced a clear preference for clean, natural, and sustainable products. Thus, cannabinoid based beauty products should be crafted with well-sourced cannabinoids and nourishing ingredients.

If you’re interested in trying to formulate with CBD ingredients like thc-free broad spectrum distillate or CBD isolate, you can get some of the purest CBD ingredients on the market from OBX. Furthermore, we have CBN isolate, THCV isolate, CBC isolate, CBDV isolate, and CBG isolate all available as well if you’re interested in bringing the therapeutic potential of minor cannabinoids into your beauty-blends. 

Finally, if you’d like to work with our world-class formulation team to customize your cannabinoid profile in your beauty products, please reach out and we’d be happy to provide you with additional information. 

 

 

References

1) Zion Market Research. Global Cannabis Infused Beauty Products Market Worth USD 18.05 Billion By 2026: Zion Market Research. Global News Wire. 2019, August 16. https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/08/16/1903064/0/en/Global-Cannabis-Infused-Beauty-Products-Market-Worth-USD-18-05-Billion-By-2026-Zion-Market-Research.html

2) Danziger, Pamela N, 6 Trends Shaping The Future Of The $532B Beauty Business. Forbes. 2019, September 1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2019/09/01/6-trends-shaping-the-future-of-the-532b-beauty-business/#10246ca7588d  

3) Clark, Julia. With sales mixed and disruption rampant, what is the future of beauty?. Ipsos Market Research. 2019, August 26. https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/news-polls/sales-mixed-disruption-rampant-what-is-future-of-beauty

4) Parletta, Natalie. Could Hemp Be The Next Big Thing In Sustainable Cotton, Fuel, Wood And Plastic?. Forbes. 2019, June 28. https://www.forbes.com/sites/natalieparletta/2019/06/28/could-hemp-be-the-next-big-thing-in-sustainable-cotton-fuel-wood-and-plastic/#6d3afae821c2 

5) Tóth KF, Ádám D, Bíró T, Oláh A. Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the “C(ut)annabinoid” System. Molecules. 2019;24(5):918. Published 2019 Mar 6. doi:10.3390/molecules24050918

6) Oláh A, Markovics A, Szabó-Papp J, Szabó PT, Stott C, Zouboulis CC, Bíró T. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2016 Sep;25(9):701-7. doi: 10.1111/exd.13042. Epub 2016 Jun 15. PMID: 27094344.

7) Wilkinson, Jonathan D, Williamson, Elizabeth M, Cannabinoids inhibit human keratinocyte proliferation through a non-CB1/CB2 mechanism and have a potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis. Journal of Dermatological Science. Published by Elsevier. 2007, February.

8) Appendino G, Gibbons S, Giana A, Pagani A, Grassi G, Stavri M, Smith E, Rahman MM. Antibacterial cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa: a structure-activity study. J Nat Prod. 2008 Aug;71(8):1427-30. doi: 10.1021/np8002673. Epub 2008 Aug 6. PMID: 18681481.

9) DeLong GT, Wolf CE, Poklis A, Lichtman AH. Pharmacological evaluation of the natural constituent of Cannabis sativa, cannabichromene and its modulation by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Nov 1;112(1-2):126-33. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.05.019. PMID: 20619971; PMCID: PMC2967639.

10) Maione S, Piscitelli F, Gatta L, Vita D, De Petrocellis L, Palazzo E, de Novellis V, Di Marzo V. Non-psychoactive cannabinoids modulate the descending pathway of antinociception in anaesthetized rats through several mechanisms of action. Br J Pharmacol. 2011 Feb;162(3):584-96. doi: 10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.01063.x. PMID: 20942863; PMCID: PMC3041249.

11) Oláh A, Markovics A, Szabó-Papp J, Szabó PT, Stott C, Zouboulis CC, Bíró T. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2016 Sep;25(9):701-7. doi: 10.1111/exd.13042. Epub 2016 Jun 15. PMID: 27094344.

12) Oláh A, Markovics A, Szabó-Papp J, Szabó PT, Stott C, Zouboulis CC, Bíró T. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2016 Sep;25(9):701-7. doi: 10.1111/exd.13042. Epub 2016 Jun 15. PMID: 27094344.

13) Tóth KF, Ádám D, Bíró T, Oláh A. Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the “C(ut)annabinoid” System. Molecules. 2019;24(5):918. Published 2019 Mar 6. doi:10.3390/molecules24050918

14) Bolognini D, Costa B, Maione S, et al. The plant cannabinoid Delta9-tetrahydrocannabivarin can decrease signs of inflammation and inflammatory pain in mice. Br J Pharmacol. 2010;160(3):677-687. doi:10.1111/j.1476-5381.2010.00756.x

15) Oláh A, Markovics A, Szabó-Papp J, Szabó PT, Stott C, Zouboulis CC, Bíró T. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2016 Sep;25(9):701-7. doi: 10.1111/exd.13042. Epub 2016 Jun 15. PMID: 27094344.

16) Palmieri B, Laurino C, Vadalà M. A therapeutic effect of cbd-enriched ointment in inflammatory skin diseases and cutaneous scars. Clin Ter. 2019;170(2):e93-e99. doi:10.7417/CT.2019.2116

17) Armstrong JL, Hill DS, McKee CS, Hernandez-Tiedra S, Lorente M, Lopez-Valero I, Eleni Anagnostou M, Babatunde F, Corazzari M, Redfern CPF, Velasco G, Lovat PE. Exploiting cannabinoid-induced cytotoxic autophagy to drive melanoma cell death. J Invest Dermatol. 2015 Jun;135(6):1629-1637. doi: 10.1038/jid.2015.45. Epub 2015 Feb 10. PMID: 25674907.

18) Xu DH, Cullen BD, Tang M, Fang Y. The Effectiveness of Topical Cannabidiol Oil in Symptomatic Relief of Peripheral Neuropathy of the Lower Extremities. Curr Pharm Biotechnol. 2020;21(5):390-402. doi: 10.2174/1389201020666191202111534. PMID: 31793418.

19) Stahl V, Vasudevan K. Comparison of Efficacy of Cannabinoids versus Commercial Oral Care Products in Reducing Bacterial Content from Dental Plaque: A Preliminary Observation. Cureus. 2020;12(1):e6809. Published 2020 Jan 29. doi:10.7759/cureus.6809

20) Ständer S, Reinhardt HW, Luger TA. Topische Cannabinoidagonisten. Eine effektive, neue Möglichkeit zur Behandlung von chronischem Pruritus [Topical cannabinoid agonists. An effective new possibility for treating chronic pruritus]. Hautarzt. 2006;57(9):801-807. doi:10.1007/s00105-006-1180-1

Cannabis Leaf

Cannabinoids In The Beauty Industry

Recently, we’ve seen a surge in beauty products leveraging the power of cannabinoids and their therapeutic effects. According to Zion Market research, the Cannabinoid-Based Beauty Products Market was worth $5.1 billion in 2018 and is expected to multiply to $18 billion by 2026. (1)

In this post we will break down why cannabinoids are taking the beauty market by storm. First, we will share the current market size and trends that foreshadow success for cannabinoids based beauty products. Second, we’ll share how endocannabinoids and phytocannabinoids interact with our skin health. Next, we’ll share the scientific literature detailing specific cannabinoids’ impact as a topical remedy. Finally, we’ll dive into what the future of this category might look like. 

The Current Beauty Market

The global beauty industry is currently valued at $532 billion, according to Forbes. “While projections for growth vary, most agree it will continue to advance at a 5-7% CAGR to reach or exceed $800 billion by 2025.”(2) This massive market comprises several smaller segments, including skincare, oral hygiene, body care, and cosmetics. If you walk down a drugstore aisle, you’ll see evidence of this thriving industry in countless types of shampoos, ointments, moisturizers, anti-aging treatments and so on.

Today’s consumers are looking for natural, clean, and sustainable beauty products. According to market research by Ipsos, two-thirds of consumers reported that they would be, “interested in trying new products from other brands if they are natural.” Another 59% said they would be interested in trying products that are “clean.” Finally, 55% said they would be interested in “sustainable” products.(3)

Fortunately, many cannabinoid-based beauty products fit these descriptors. Cannabinoids work naturally with the body’s endocannabinoid system to produce different results. Plus, hemp has a reputation as a “sustainable, organic and regenerative agricultural crop.(4) As for if hemp is “clean” or not, that depends on how plants are processed or formulated. But, there are plenty of ways to create clean, hemp-derived products.

Above all else, however, beauty buyers want products that actually work. Hemp-infused beauty products are purported to be better than conventional options because hemp oil is similar to natural oils that are produced by the human body. Plus, skin has natural cannabinoid receptors, which makes topical cannabinoids absorbable and effective.

There is a huge opportunity within the multi-billion dollar beauty industry for natural, clean, and sustainable products and cannabinoid-based beauty products are in a position to grab a lot of that growth. Let’s dive into the research to see why cannabinoids are so effective for many different treatments.

Cannabinoids Role In Skin Health:

In a 2019 review, scientists studied the role of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in our integumentary system (skin). Previous studies had demonstrated the importance of the ECS in immune function and the nervous system, but the role of the ECS in the skin was less understood. By the time the review was finished that had all changed.

The authors concluded that the ECS was “deeply involved in the maintenance of skin homeostasis, barrier formation and regeneration, and its dysregulation was implicated to contribute to several highly prevalent diseases and disorders, e.g., atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, scleroderma, acne, hair growth and pigmentation disorders, keratin diseases, various tumors, and itch.”(5)

In short, different cannabinoids can tell cells what to do and when to do it. Normally, cannabinoids produced by the body (endocannabinoids) manage all of this on their own, and skin remains healthy. However, when your integumentary system is out of balance, you end up with acne, dry skin, or some of the other disorders listed above. If you’re interested in learning more about the process of cannabinoids, enzymes, and receptors you can read this post.

For years, we’ve been treating symptoms instead of causes. But, now that we know how the ECS can cause skin conditions, we can actually address the root of these issues. Phytocannabinoids, or cannabinoids that come from plants, can bind with endogenous cannabinoid receptor sites much like endocannabinoids do. This means phytocannabinoids can be used to stimulate underactive sites or downregulate overactive ones. 

By stimulating or inhibiting various receptor sites, cannabinoids may be able to produce targeted hair growth or loss, alleviate sunburn, darken or lighten skin pigmentation, fight tumors, alleviate dry skin, and stop acne or itches.(5) If this is all true, the cannabinoid-based beauty market may be even bigger than expected.

However, as of today, a lot of this is still theoretical. If research into the other aspects of the ECS has taught us anything, it’s that cannabinoid signalling is a delicate and complex science. Getting the right phytocannabinoids to the right receptor sites is no easy task. Questions about how cannabinoids work with the skin loom large and we will surface the most up-to-date research on how cannabinoids can influence the beauty category. 

Minor Cannabinoids’ Therapeutic Potential In Skincare:  

In a 2016 study, scientists examined how a range of minor cannabinoids influenced sebocyte function. As a refresher, sebocytes are gland cells that produce natural oils to protect skin. But, when too much of this oil is produced acne breakouts can occur. At the same time, if too little oil is manufactured, the result may be dry skin. 

Amazingly, many different cannabinoids seemed to either increase or suppress the function of these cells. In particular CBG and CBGV increased sebaceous liquid synthesis, leading researchers to conclude that they might be able to treat “dry-skin syndrome.” On the other hand, CBC, CBDV, and especially THCV, are promising anti-acne agents.(6) 

We’ll now dive deeper into the therapeutic potential of these rare cannabinoids.

Cannabigerol (CBG) Supporting Skin Health: 

Studies have found CBG offers “potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis” as an anti-inflammatory.(7)  Psoriasis causes cellular buildup on the surface of the skin, and experts surmise that inflammation is a root cause. There is also evidence CBG acts as an effective antibacterial agent, which could be useful in the treatment of acne and other bacterial skin conditions.(8)

Cannabichromene (CBC) Supporting Skin Health: 

This exciting cannabinoid has shown anti-inflammatory and analgesic activity in animal studies.(9)(10) One 2016 study noted that CBC displayed “remarkable anti-inflammatory actions” related to acne.(11) A cannabinoid that can calm inflammation while also relieving pain could have immense use since many skin problems tied to inflammation — such as dermatitis, psoriasis and eczema — cause severe discomfort. 

Cannabidivarin (CBDV) Supporting Skin Health: 

Recent studies indicate CBDV may help dry skin syndrome as well as acne.(12) Researchers also found that CBDV may reduce allergic inflammation, atopic dermatitis, acne and seborrhea (a.k.a. dandruff).(13) These properties could make CBDV ideal for incorporating into hypoallergenic products, or topicals designed for sensitive, itch-prone skin. 

Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV) Supporting Skin Health: 

Unlike its non-varin counterpart, THCV is non-psychotropic, and research on animal models indicates THCV can decrease signs of inflammation and inflammatory pain, a combination that could be useful in topical analgesics.(14) THCV also has been found to suppress basal sebaceous lipid synthesis, which could help acne sufferers whose condition is triggered by excessive oil production. Experimental Dermatology noted that of all of the phytocannabinoids examined, THCV showed the most promise of becoming a “highly efficient, novel anti-acne agent.” (15)

CBD Supporting Skin Health:

CBD for Psoriasis, Acne, & Scarring: A 2019 study examined the effects of CBD ointment on psoriasis, acne, and scarring in a group of 20 patients. After three months of CBD supplementation, the patients exhibit improved skin hydration, superior skin elasticity, and general symptom reduction.(16)

While this small study is certainly just a start, it’s very exciting to see CBD delivering on some of the anti-aging, anti-scarring, and anti-acne properties that were suggested by studies on the ECS.

CBD & THC fighting melanoma: In a 2015 animal study, scientists applied a mixture of CBD and THC to cancerous melanomas on mice. The cannabinoids killed off and inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that topical creams may really work against skin cancer.(17)

CBD for topical pain management: Another study published this year found that cannabinoids could be a great addition to current offerings. Over a month-long, placebo-controlled study, a group of adults suffering from nerve pain reported that CBD oil delivered a significant reduction in intense pain, sharp pain, cold and itchy sensations without reporting any adverse effects.(18) CBD might not replace Icy Hot or Aleve tomorrow, but these strong results show it could be a valuable addition to the pain management market.

Cannabinoids may be the future of toothpaste: The toothpaste aisle is full of tons of different options, many of which have the same cleansing chemicals. However, this might change soon. Earlier this year, a preliminary study revealed that many cannabinoids are better at killing the bacteria that cause dental plaque than commercially available toothpaste.(19)

In particular, dental plaque samples treated with CBGA, CBN, CBG, CBD, and CBC all yielded fewer bacteria counts than those treated with Oral-B or Colgate toothpaste. However, it is worth noting that the study only had 60 participants. We’ll likely need to see a few larger studies replicate these results before 9 out 10 dentists start recommending cannabinoid-based toothpaste.

Cannabinoids could make great itch cream: In 2006, German scientists reported that the cannabimimetic N-palmitoyl ethanolamine (PEA) reduced levels of itchiness by 86.4%. Given the recent breakthroughs in cannabinoid cultivation, it’s only a matter of time before someone replaces PEA with a more natural, accessible cannabinoid. (20) CBD looks like a good option as both PEA and CBD are known to enhance anandamide signalling. 

 

The therapeutic range displayed in this research explains why the beauty industry is so excited about cannabinoids. While there is plenty more to learn, these early signals show us how important it is for additional research to be conducted on cannabinoid-based beauty and topical products. 

 

The Future of Cannabinoid-Based Beauty

As always, it’s worth noting that cannabinoid supplements are only as good as their sourcing and formulating. Cannabinoids have a number of benefits, but these can easily be outweighed by harsh chemicals or unwanted additives. 

We anticipate seeing cannabinoids become additives to almost every product in the beauty category and we know that consumers in the beauty industry have voiced a clear preference for clean, natural, and sustainable products. Thus, cannabinoid based beauty products should be crafted with well-sourced cannabinoids and nourishing ingredients.

If you’re interested in trying to formulate with CBD ingredients like thc-free broad spectrum distillate or CBD isolate, you can get some of the purest CBD ingredients on the market from OBX. Furthermore, we have CBN isolate, THCV isolate, CBC isolate, CBDV isolate, and CBG isolate all available as well if you’re interested in bringing the therapeutic potential of minor cannabinoids into your beauty-blends. 

Finally, if you’d like to work with our world-class formulation team to customize your cannabinoid profile in your beauty products, please reach out and we’d be happy to provide you with additional information. 

 

 

References

1) Zion Market Research. Global Cannabis Infused Beauty Products Market Worth USD 18.05 Billion By 2026: Zion Market Research. Global News Wire. 2019, August 16. https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2019/08/16/1903064/0/en/Global-Cannabis-Infused-Beauty-Products-Market-Worth-USD-18-05-Billion-By-2026-Zion-Market-Research.html

2) Danziger, Pamela N, 6 Trends Shaping The Future Of The $532B Beauty Business. Forbes. 2019, September 1. https://www.forbes.com/sites/pamdanziger/2019/09/01/6-trends-shaping-the-future-of-the-532b-beauty-business/#10246ca7588d  

3) Clark, Julia. With sales mixed and disruption rampant, what is the future of beauty?. Ipsos Market Research. 2019, August 26. https://www.ipsos.com/en-us/news-polls/sales-mixed-disruption-rampant-what-is-future-of-beauty

4) Parletta, Natalie. Could Hemp Be The Next Big Thing In Sustainable Cotton, Fuel, Wood And Plastic?. Forbes. 2019, June 28. https://www.forbes.com/sites/natalieparletta/2019/06/28/could-hemp-be-the-next-big-thing-in-sustainable-cotton-fuel-wood-and-plastic/#6d3afae821c2 

5) Tóth KF, Ádám D, Bíró T, Oláh A. Cannabinoid Signaling in the Skin: Therapeutic Potential of the “C(ut)annabinoid” System. Molecules. 2019;24(5):918. Published 2019 Mar 6. doi:10.3390/molecules24050918

6) Oláh A, Markovics A, Szabó-Papp J, Szabó PT, Stott C, Zouboulis CC, Bíró T. Differential effectiveness of selected non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids on human sebocyte functions implicates their introduction in dry/seborrhoeic skin and acne treatment. Exp Dermatol. 2016 Sep;25(9):701-7. doi: 10.1111/exd.13042. Epub 2016 Jun 15. PMID: 27094344.

7) Wilkinson, Jonathan D, Williamson, Elizabeth M, Cannabinoids inhibit human keratinocyte proliferation through a non-CB1/CB2 mechanism and have a potential therapeutic value in the treatment of psoriasis. Journal of Dermatological Science. Published by Elsevier. 2007, February.

8) Appendino G, Gibbons S, Giana A, Pagani A, Grassi G, Stavri M, Smith E, Rahman MM. Antibacterial cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa: a structure-activity study. J Nat Prod. 2008 Aug;71(8):1427-30. doi: 10.1021/np8002673. Epub 2008 Aug 6. PMID: 18681481.

9) DeLong GT, Wolf CE, Poklis A, Lichtman AH. Pharmacological evaluation of the natural constituent of Cannabis sativa, cannabichromene and its modulation by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Nov 1;112(1-2):126-33. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2010.05.019. PMID: 20619971; PMCID: PMC2967639.

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